Monthly Archives: February 2017

Three Tips To Insure A Great School Year

Start early and make it a habit before you introduce TV and video games. Limit screen-time, including TV, video games, and computer. Trade some of their structured activities for free time. Appeal to kids’ natural interests (e.g. sports: try hiking or canoeing, science: try gardening or rock collecting). Model outdoor time behavior yourself and focus on fun!

For me, being greener starts with getting outside and actually enjoying this beautiful planet of ours. I worry that in today’s society, people are so focused on saving the planet that they forget to appreciate its beauty and teach children to know the Earth before we ask them to save it.

The poll, conducted by the education reform group Stand for Children, of 600 Hoosiers shows that 83% of voters believe layoff decisions should be based on teacher effectiveness and student achievement and not seniority. The poll had a margin of error of plus or minus 2.4%. Here are some other findings.

The Crenshaw campaign instituted a tremendous voter contact program and volunteer ground game. Being short on both time and money in a heavily Democratic district, we decided to focus all of our efforts on likely voters.

This point is significant because I think it explains the timing of Ms. Baker’s resignation. Not to slight the fine work of Brian Jones, but my take is that Ms. Baker missed the team that she and Mr. Nida had formed in expanding the number of charters while at the same time increasing the quality of school performance.

Many people don’t see how dropouts in large cities have anything to do with their own lives. They feel protected against the problems with schools in other areas and don’t believe that failing schools can have any impact on their own well being or safety. It reminds me of the ostrich with his head in the sand. If nothing else, you’d think people would understand that increased crime rates increase the tax money spent to jail criminals.

What Caruolo fails to acknowledge is that teachers, through their union leaders, have always been at the table and far from alienated. But sadly, the only focus has been on salaries and benefits.

Reading difficulty often leads to school failure. A recently-released study by the Annie E. Casey Foundation found that one in six children who are not reading proficiently in third grade do not graduate from high school on time, a rate four times greater than proficient readers.